The Trestle Engineering
Project Information

Converting Rails To Trails: The Trestle Project

The Trestle is a 1.5 mile abandoned railroad alignment purchased by Great Rivers Greenway.  It is the same railroad alignment that connects from the McKinley Bridge to Branch Street and was renovated in 2007 as part of the McKinley Bridge Bikeway. 

Turning Rails to Trails, The Trestle project is a paved bike path and walking path beginning at Branch Street, where it will connect with the Riverfront Trail and the existing McKinley Bridge Bikeway. 

The Trestle is elevated above North Market Street adjacent to Produce Row, the city's fruit and vegetable wholesale district and continues as it crosses over Interstate 70.  Making your way across the paved bike path and walking path, you will see views of downtown St. Louis, the Mississippi River and the adjacent neighborhoods.  The Trestle touches down near the intersection of Howard and Hadley Avenues just north of the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. 

Status

Rails To Trails Timeline

2005: Great Rivers Greenway purchased the Trestle with the vision of turning abandoned rails to trails.

2007: Great Rivers Greenway initiated work to develop a conceptual plan for developing the trestle into a linear public park and greenway, converting unused rails to trails.  Over the past several years, detailed engineering plans have been prepared in anticipation of construction. 

2010: Great Rivers Greenway hired a construction management firm to work with the design team to recommend strategies to construct the project in phases as well as identify construction methods for renovating the elevated deck.  It was identified that the Trestle could be constructed in two phases and Great Rivers Greenway is determining the best strategy to move towards construction in the next several years. 

Mid 2011-October 2012: Great Rivers Greenway began work to develop plans to paint the portion of the Trestle over Interstate 70.  The painting of the Trestle began during the summer of 2012 and was completed in October 2012. 

Today: Great Rivers Greenway is working on identifying trail connections from both ends of the elevated segment of the Trestle to improve the connectivity for pedestrians and bicyclists along the paved bike path and walking path.

Branch Street at the northern end of the Trestle would provide a connection from the neighborhoods west of I-70 to the Trestle, the paved bike path at McKinley Bridge and the Riverfront walking trail. The District is currently working with the City of St. Louis, the Missouri Dept. of Transportation, residents, businesses and community leaders on plans to establish a safe and accessible pedestrian and bike path along Branch Street.

On the southern end of the Trestle, Great Rivers Greenway is working with the City of St. Louis to identify a solution for a walking path that would connect the Trestle at the intersection of Howard and Hadley Streets towards downtown St. Louis.   Preliminary planning is underway on this segment.

Click here to learn more about how Great Rivers Greenway is turning rails to trails and the Trestle project.


Partners City of St. Louis, Grace Hill Neighborhood Services, Missouri Department of Transportation 

The Trestle

Photos
The Trestle Alignment
The Trestle Alignment
By: Unknown
The Trestle View of Downtown
The Trestle View of Downtown
By: Unknown
Comments from the Community
Comments from the Community
By: Unknown
Iron Horse Public Forum
Iron Horse Public Forum
By: Unknown
The Trestle from the street
The Trestle from the street
By: Unknown
On the Trestle
On the Trestle
By: Unknown
Photos from the Greenways Image Library
Residents listen to architects & planners on the project in June 2013.
Residents listen to architects...
By: Michael Kilfoy, Studio X
More than 200 people attended the Trestle Open House on June 18, 2013.
More than 200 people attended...
By: Michael Kilfoy, Studio X
View of Trestle over I-70 with construction of new highway ramps
View of Trestle over I-70...
By: Todd Antoine
Painting of the Trestle from northbound I-70
Painting of the Trestle from...
By: Todd Antoine